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Squared Circle Sirens

Petition to Change the New York State Athletic Commission Guidelines

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SUPPORT AND SIGN THE PETITION HERE : Change.org

This is an article that needs to be shared throughout the Wrestling Community. It will effect many independent wrestling companies around New York state. Please click the link on the top of this page and sign the petition for New York State Athletics Commission to change their mind on these new guidelines.

These guidelines include companies no longer being able to rent out their space for smaller companies to do their shows which will cause a ripple effect in talent being able to perform.  Also, heel characters not being able to perform to their standards and having to tone down their act.

According to PWINSIDER:

The New York State Athletic Commission, which oversees professional wrestling in that State (which as a matter of full disclosure for those who don’t know, is where I reside) is planning a number of changes to the landscape of professional wrestling in NY as part of new rules that will take effect in January 2017.  Many of the rules are a result of the Commission updating their amended guidelines now that Mixed Martial Arts is legal in the State with the NYSAC having to oversee that sport starting this November.

While these changes likely won’t see any ripple effect for WWE, Northeast Wrestling or Ring of Honor, they may effectively make it too expensive for some independent promotions to continue to exist in the greater New York area.

The primary change is that promotions may no longer lend or “rent” their promoting license out to others, which will be a major change to the NY independent wrestling landscape.  According to language in the revised NYSAC Guidebook, “Engaging in fraud or fraudulent practices, or for dishonest or misleading advertising, including representing a professional wrestling event as anything but an exhibition, availing the entity’s license to another, or for demonstrated untrustworthiness or incompetency in relation to the promotion or conduct of professional wrestling exhibitions” could result in the promoter’s license being revoked.

The language of the rules also remain very interesting as they would effectively prevent professional wrestlers, while working as heels, from getting heat by playing off the audience.  It was noted, “In no event shall a participant be permitted to threaten, molest, hit or abuse, physically or verbally, any spectator, or engage in any conduct endangering the health, safety, or well being of any spectator during the course of a professional wrestling exhibition.”